The Demon Bookseller of Fleet Street’s 2013 Favorites

franzencomesalive:

I spend a lot of time reading words and writing words. I thought it might be nice just to look at pictures for a bit. 

Favorite 2013 releases:

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resposting to remember all these 2013 books I missed! 

allysonkalea:

nevver:

Hey Monster

yes yes to all

brightwalldarkroom:

BRIGHT WALL/DARK ROOM TURNS FIVE!(and a whole lot is about to change…)
Yesterday marked our fifth anniversary, five amazing years since we first came up with a little idea for a different kind of film site, gathered some friends together, and opened up our doors. When BW/DR started, our focus was—and remains—on publishing unique and personal responses to films, about the ways that movies interact with our lives, inform them or are informed by them. For the better part of 4 years, we published an essay or two every week, right here on tumblr, convinced that it was the best place to build and grow a community of like-minded readers. And it worked, far better than we ever imagined. As of today, this site has nearly 220,000 followers and has grown beyond our wildest dreams.
About a year and a half ago, we decided to start a magazine. We found a publisher, held a fundraiser, brought in over $2000, and launched Bright Wall/Dark Room magazine in June 2013. The past year we’ve been mostly focused on making the very best magazine possible, though we kept up a presence here as well, running essays that, for one reason or another, didn’t quite fit into the magazine. We realize that led to some confusion, because, as our soon-to-be brand new publisher (we’ll get to that) told us a few months ago, “you guys have like 5 different places to go online and it’s really hard to figure out what you are or where to go to get things”. We agree, and apologize. Which is why we’re simplifying things a whole lot, beginning today.    
So basically, some really big changes are afoot here at Bright Wall/Dark Room, and we wanted to tell you all about them.
Going forward, we have officially decided to focus all of our energies on Bright Wall/Dark Room magazine, which, in the past year, has taken off in all kinds of new and interesting directions, and started opening up a lot of doors for us. Beginning with our August issue, we’ll be moving to 29th Street Publishing (home to Harper’s, Poetry, n+1, The Weekly Rumpus, The Awl: Weekend Companion, Maura, Scratch, and a whole lot more). They’ve slightly modified the magazine app (though not much), and completely revamped the online web-based version of the magazine (which we can’t wait to show you!).
Once that transition happens, we’ll be putting all of our energy entirely into the magazine, and this site—which we’ve built from the ground up and loved so dearly—will no longer be running any full-length essays. The only way to read any BW/DR essays or writing, beginning August 1st, will be to subscribe to the magazine. The magazine will be centralized at this address (http://brightwalldarkroom.com) and the current version of the site, the one you’re reading right now, will revert back to its original tumblr address (http://brightwalldarkroom.tumblr.com). We will continue to post to this tumblr, but those posts will be limited to excerpts from the magazine, as well as other film and television flotsam and jetsam. You know, how the rest of the world uses tumblr. 
Since our brand new issue just came out, we’ll be spending the rest of this week focusing largely on that around here, posting excerpts and artwork from the issue. But after that, we’ll spend the remainder of July posting some of our favorite essays from the past five years of Bright Wall/Dark Room - a fifth year anniversary celebration and a going away party of sorts, all at once.
It’s been a fantastic ride, tumblr, and we sincerely thank each and every one of you who’ve helped us get this far. We hope you’ll choose to join us as we continue building and growing our magazine—for just $2 a month (or $20 per year), you can still receive instant access to everything we do…

brightwalldarkroom:

BRIGHT WALL/DARK ROOM TURNS FIVE!
(and a whole lot is about to change…)

Yesterday marked our fifth anniversary, five amazing years since we first came up with a little idea for a different kind of film site, gathered some friends together, and opened up our doors. When BW/DR started, our focus was—and remains—on publishing unique and personal responses to films, about the ways that movies interact with our lives, inform them or are informed by them. For the better part of 4 years, we published an essay or two every week, right here on tumblr, convinced that it was the best place to build and grow a community of like-minded readers. And it worked, far better than we ever imagined. As of today, this site has nearly 220,000 followers and has grown beyond our wildest dreams.

About a year and a half ago, we decided to start a magazine. We found a publisher, held a fundraiser, brought in over $2000, and launched Bright Wall/Dark Room magazine in June 2013. The past year we’ve been mostly focused on making the very best magazine possible, though we kept up a presence here as well, running essays that, for one reason or another, didn’t quite fit into the magazine. We realize that led to some confusion, because, as our soon-to-be brand new publisher (we’ll get to that) told us a few months ago, “you guys have like 5 different places to go online and it’s really hard to figure out what you are or where to go to get things”. We agree, and apologize. Which is why we’re simplifying things a whole lot, beginning today.    

So basically, some really big changes are afoot here at Bright Wall/Dark Room, and we wanted to tell you all about them.

Going forward, we have officially decided to focus all of our energies on Bright Wall/Dark Room magazine, which, in the past year, has taken off in all kinds of new and interesting directions, and started opening up a lot of doors for us. Beginning with our August issue, we’ll be moving to 29th Street Publishing (home to Harper’s, Poetry, n+1, The Weekly Rumpus, The Awl: Weekend Companion, Maura, Scratch, and a whole lot more). They’ve slightly modified the magazine app (though not much), and completely revamped the online web-based version of the magazine (which we can’t wait to show you!).

Once that transition happens, we’ll be putting all of our energy entirely into the magazine, and this site—which we’ve built from the ground up and loved so dearly—will no longer be running any full-length essays. The only way to read any BW/DR essays or writing, beginning August 1st, will be to subscribe to the magazine. The magazine will be centralized at this address (http://brightwalldarkroom.com) and the current version of the site, the one you’re reading right now, will revert back to its original tumblr address (http://brightwalldarkroom.tumblr.com). We will continue to post to this tumblr, but those posts will be limited to excerpts from the magazine, as well as other film and television flotsam and jetsam. You know, how the rest of the world uses tumblr. 

Since our brand new issue just came out, we’ll be spending the rest of this week focusing largely on that around here, posting excerpts and artwork from the issue. But after that, we’ll spend the remainder of July posting some of our favorite essays from the past five years of Bright Wall/Dark Room - a fifth year anniversary celebration and a going away party of sorts, all at once.

It’s been a fantastic ride, tumblr, and we sincerely thank each and every one of you who’ve helped us get this far. We hope you’ll choose to join us as we continue building and growing our magazine—for just $2 a month (or $20 per year), you can still receive instant access to everything we do…

Walking-Dead-Season-4-Mid-Season-Premiere-1

My husband works at a treatment facility for youth with emotional and behavioral issues. He reports that his students love films and novels about the end of the world. They fully believe the world as they know it probably will end, whether it be by war, climate change, or economic collapse. They aren’t afraid of this, though. What they love about these narratives is the idea of being a survivor, of seeing the structures of the existing world crumble, of creating a society full of fellow survivors who will create a new world the right way. Who can blame them? They’ve already been failed by family, school, and social services. For them, and many disenfranchised people, the idea of collapse comes as a kind of relief. The world is bad. Perhaps destroying it and starting over is the only way to create a better future. Apparently, my husband’s students are not alone.  Apocalyptic narratives are all over current popular culture, from films like World War Z to Noah to the wildly popular series The Walking Dead on the small screen.

(Read More at The Nervous Breakdown) 

Echo Lake Stuff

Hey all! Here is a bunch of Echo Lake stuff, in case you wanna try-before-you-buy or read some of my words in other places: 

La Review…review of Echo Lake: http://losangelesreview.org/book-review-echo-lake-leticia-trent/
Excerpt from My Bookish Ways: http://www.mybookishways.com/2014/07/excerpt-echo-lake-by-letitia-trent.html
Book Notes from Necessary Fiction: http://necessaryfiction.com/blog/ResearchNotesEchoLake
Little essay about women in horror from Bookriot: http://bookriot.com/2014/07/11/horror-women-write/

bushygifs:

by wtf-albumcover

Came back to tumblr just to reblog Kate Bush gifs. 

bushygifs:

by wtf-albumcover

Came back to tumblr just to reblog Kate Bush gifs. 

Just last week, I finished this nine month project I’ve been working on. 

Just last week, I finished this nine month project I’ve been working on. 

brightwalldarkroom:

"To some, The Grand Budapest Hotel and its careful editing around the violent horrors of World War II is making light of the war’s atrocities. However, I would argue that, like the pastries that are used to disguise the tools Gustave uses to escape the prison, Anderson is disguising his real message in the shape of something light-hearted and beautiful. Although his movie is entertaining and funny, he is still making a very specific play on the nature of memory and storytelling. Like children’s cartoons that often disguise deep messages lost on adults, The Grand Budapest Hotel is a caper that masks a commentary on the insidious nature of fascism. It is seen in what is not seen, blurred by the black bars on either side of the screen. Memory makes it tolerable, even entertaining, because that is often the only way we are able to consume the horrors of the past.”
—Michelle Said on The Grand Budapest Hotel, Bright Wall/Dark Room, Issue #11, April 2014)

brightwalldarkroom:

"To some, The Grand Budapest Hotel and its careful editing around the violent horrors of World War II is making light of the war’s atrocities. However, I would argue that, like the pastries that are used to disguise the tools Gustave uses to escape the prison, Anderson is disguising his real message in the shape of something light-hearted and beautiful. Although his movie is entertaining and funny, he is still making a very specific play on the nature of memory and storytelling. Like children’s cartoons that often disguise deep messages lost on adults, The Grand Budapest Hotel is a caper that masks a commentary on the insidious nature of fascism. It is seen in what is not seen, blurred by the black bars on either side of the screen. Memory makes it tolerable, even entertaining, because that is often the only way we are able to consume the horrors of the past.”


—Michelle Said on The Grand Budapest Hotel, Bright Wall/Dark Room, Issue #11, April 2014)

“That night, it had rained so hard that the plants with closed, hard petals were forced open, their inner pollen released and drowned in the muck. The flowers that had bloomed all summer were pummeled and smashed. It rained so hard that pools of water formed in the low places on dirt roads, making some impassable, trapping men in the houses they hated, the women they loved or had once loved angry and chain smoking, the children unable to leave for school, the children trapped in houses they hated with mothers who drank and slurred and watched beautiful women and men on television shouting at each other or living in places that the children had never seen and could hardly imagine, the children afraid and angry but also desiring to pick at the wound that made the mother cry or shout or even hit, and the women trapped in the houses they hated, with the children that they loved and so could wound, with the men they loved and who wounded them with their indifference or the liquor they bought instead of bread, and the people who lived alone and the people who lived in ways that Heartshorne would not approve of — men with men, women with women, there were a few of them, lying low. They were more afraid than usual, paradoxically fearing the inability to leave the homes they’d thought of as sanctuaries from the pressures of the church pot luck or the staring eyes at the general store. It was terrifying to be stuck.”

Letitia TrentEcho Lake (via shimmer)

A little excerpt from my upcoming novel :)

STANNING THESE TWO FOREVER, SORRYNOTSORRY

(Source: andersondaily)